March 23, 2019

Promotion for Hanna continues as Joel appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon last March 21st. Aside from discussing the show, Joel also taught Jimmy a Swedish Midsummer celebration! Check out the interview below, and screencaps in our gallery, along with one high-quality still, thanks to my friend Sammy at Shane West Network.

Joel and Mireille recently sat down with Los Angeles Times to discuss Hanna. They talked about a lot of interesting things, including how the dynamic differs from what we were used to with The Killing, their characters, and the best of all, how they got cast! You can read the full article at the Los Angeles Times website, but here’s are some snippets:

“It’s super wonderful to be back working with each other,” Enos says at Amazon’s Culver City headquarters, where she and Kinnaman have come together to discuss the series. Kinnaman smiles and nods in agreement.
Playing adversaries instead of partners marks a dramatic shift for the two actors — one they have excitedly embraced.

“It was a little trippy the first day we had shooting because the dynamic could not be more different,” Kinnaman says. “But after a couple of takes, it just flowed. We really work well together, and we pick up on little things each other does. I go this way a little bit, and she goes right there. It’s a little dance. It makes it so easy and fun.”

They both welcome the change in dynamics for “Hanna.”

“If we were playing two pals,” Enos says, “I don’t know if we could have done it.”

“I liked that it was so polar opposite,” Kinnaman adds. “Because we had such a good and long relationship on ‘The Killing,’ it was very important to both of us. ‘The Killing’ is one of those things that kinda stuck with people. There’s a danger of going back to the well.”

Enos was the first to be approached by Farr for the series. “We met at a spa hotel where she was shooting in England,” he says, “and I thought she would be perfect for the re-invention of the character.”

Enos says she was asked who she felt might be a good choice to play Erik. “In my mind, the character was a little older than Joel, so I told them to send me some of their favorite names of people in their mid-40s, ex-military.

“They got back to me and said, ‘Actually we were thinking of talking to Joel and wanted to see how you felt about that. I said, ‘Favorite human! On the planet!’ ”

Looking fondly at Enos, Kinnaman says, “Mireille basically cast me.”

March 05, 2019

Joel and Mireille spoke with Collider during a set visit in Budapest, Hungary, wherein they discussed their characters’ relationship in Hanna and how it differs from what fans are used to in The Killing. Here’s a snippet:

“I think some people are gonna be a little disappointed, you know, because I know that there are a lot of people that really loved our relationship on The Killing and are very excited to see us play again,” Kinnaman told a small group of press. “I think there’s going to be an automatic longing to sort of see a similar kind of dynamic but there’s not going to be any of that. It’s very different.”

Enos echoed Kinnaman’s sentiments. “There’s no crossover, there’s none,” she said, plainly and simply. “There, we were partners with, like, a completely non-kind of romantic relationship. So we had each other’s back and we were not interested in making out. And here, we are enemies with, potentially, a history. So it’s like the polar opposite which has been fun!”

While the relationship that plays out between the two in Hanna is vastly different — Kinnaman plays Erik, Hanna’s vengeful father and former employee of Enos’ Marissa, who, for all intents and purposes, is the villain of the series — the actors were quick to acknowledge the natural chemistry that came with working together again … even if Erik’s goal is, according to Kinnaman, “securing the future and safety of Hanna.” How can he accomplish this task? “Marissa has to go down,” the actor explained.

For the duo, playing this different antagonistic dynamic has been a breath of fresh air and thoroughly enjoyable. “I wondered going in, what’s it going to be like to play this different dynamic with him because there are scenes where we end up talking about the past and stuff,” Enos revealed. “It was so fun. It’s just like a dance.”

This dance partner analogy is something actors are familiar with. When in a scene, you’re only as good as the partner you’re working with, which shows that even if the characters being played are on opposite sides, this sort of behind-the-scenes teamwork is essential. With that said, Kinnaman thoroughly agreed with Enos’ assessment, going so far as to use the same exact analogy.

February 21, 2018

After the reports saying that Joel is done with Altered Carbon, he spoke with The Hollywood Reporter and clarified that nothing is official yet.

For his part, Kinnaman acknowledges that he approached Kovacs with the understanding that his time as the character wouldn’t last beyond a single season, but offers an asterisk: “I don’t know what’s going to happen. No one does, really. Season two hasn’t been picked up yet, so who knows?”

“If it was a cool story, for sure,” he added when asked if he would want to continue on as Takeshi Kovacs. “I loved making this show. I had a great experience. The feedback has been fantastic. But I have no idea what’s going on with the second season.”

Hanna’s production is expected to run until July 12, 2018. There has to be room for more Altered Carbon after that, right? Here’s the full interview with THR:

In approaching the complicated world of Altered Carbon, what was your entry point into the show’s universe and the character of Kovacs, specifically?

There’s a lot of sci-fi stuff to wrap your head around, but when you’re preparing for the character, you have to strip all of that away. You have to peel the layers of the onion until you get down to the real heart of the character. It’s a person that is constantly dealing with loss and has made himself numb to that feeling, and therefore doesn’t care about anyone. He won’t allow himself to feel things for other people. Throughout his whole life, everyone who has ever mattered to him has been taken away from him. That’s the problem for Kovacs, in this period of his life. He’s confronted with a situation where he once again has nobody in his life who matters. Everyone he loves is dead. All of the sudden, these new people he’s using for his own gain start meaning something to him. That’s something he wants to avoid at all costs. I tried to dig down into that. 

There’s not so much you can do with him being an Envoy and part of the rebellion. It was more about boiling down to his human qualities. He’s a man who was never allowed to be a boy. To me, that means he’ll always be a boy in some way. He’s someone who has raised himself. He’s done a lot of things that are very awful. It’s someone who carries a lot of self-loathing. To me, when I play a person who is often sarcastic and doesn’t want to engage in the world, and doesn’t want to show any emotion, or doesn’t want to show people that he feels anything…to me, those are markers that this is a person who has actually been really hurt, and is trying to keep those emotions away.

Was your approach to playing Kovacs markedly different from how you would normally approach a character, since you’re playing just the latest in a long line of bodies for Takeshi Kovacs? How did you tackle the physicality?

It was a tricky thing. Usually the way I work is I often work on the physical body language, the tension. That’s usually where my imagination takes me when I start building a character. I start by thinking, is this a confident person? Where in the body is the tension of this person? If the tension is in the shoulders, does it make the head come forward? Maybe he looks at other people like this, a little bit hunched over from the side, so he’s actually a little shy, but he’s also aggressive. All of that, the physical life, starts to feed into the emotional life. Here, there’s so many layers to that, that it was almost hard to decipher. You’re someone with a physical inclination about how you normally feel in a body, and then all of the sudden you’re put into another body. That body has physical memories that are affecting you. It suddenly becomes very freeing. You’re freed up to do pretty much whatever you want. I saw him as a person who carried a lot of sadness, but was also very physically able. I made him a little hunched over, but at the same time, strong. I looked at a lot of big cats.

Good call. Kovacs is definitely a cat person more than a dog person.

For sure. (Laughs.) I was looking at a lot of lions and tigers. They’re very relaxed. If you look at them, they almost look a little sad. Almost like they don’t care about anything. It’s very powerful. When something happens and they need to be active, they react very quickly and can be very dangerous. That’s how I was looking at it.

Did you collaborate with Will Yun Lee on creating Kovacs, since he’s playing his original sleeve?

Will came in right at the tail end [of production]. He was prepping to get ready to shoot right as I was wrapping up. They showed him footage of what we had shot. He asked if there were any physical mannerisms I was doing that he could pick up on. We found a couple of things that he could do, so we could create a common thread. He did an amazing job. A really great performance.

You trained hard for the action scenes, learning martial arts, for instance. How much has that training stuck with you since walking away from the role?

It was one of the big gifts that came with this project and this job: digging into the action part of it, and the martial arts. It’s become a big part of my life now. It became part of something I was already doing, in a sense. I’ve realized I’m always happiest in life when I’m working on a role, because then your whole life is seen through this filter, through the curiosity of a new role, and trying to get as much information about a role as you can — always learning new things. When I didn’t have a role to work on, when I was in between jobs, I would feel like I had much less purpose. I would feel a little empty in a way. Now, after finding martial arts…it’s something I had found even before that, really, that I should always be learning something new. Different hobbies. The process makes me feel good. Now, martial arts has just been the perfect thing. I’ve been training a lot since I shot Altered Carbon. It’s remained a part of my life since then.

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February 02, 2018

Joel stopped the Build Series NYC studios yesterday to promote Altered Carbon. In the interview, he delved deeper into what the show is about, and also discussed the filming process and the sets that were created for the show. They also talked about Viola Davis getting him into character during the Suicide Squad filming days, Joel being an action star, the several combat training he did to prepare for the show, and he also answered questions from the audience. Check out the full interview below and screen captures in our gallery, along with photos of Joel arriving at and inside the studios!


Swedish actor Joel Kinnaman got jacked for the new Netflix show Altered Carbon. But his life nearly went in a drastically different direction.

Joel Kinnaman could’ve been a soldier. The Swedish military wanted him. Kinnaman, 38, grew up back in the days when all men in Sweden had to at least try out, and he was planning to tank on purpose. But, he recalls, “when we got out there, we had all these tests—conditioning tests, strength tests, leadership tests. My competitive spirit kicked in and completely removed any pacifistic tendencies.” He crushed the tests, got assigned to an 18-month tour of the north—way up by the Arctic Circle—and thought to himself: Fuck. What did I just do?

In the end, he wound up skipping the service. He tended bar for a while in Norway (not exactly a career) and then decided to give acting a shot. “I was a wild kid and had a lot of friends who were going in the wrong direction really fast,” Kinnaman says. “I didn’t graduate from high school because I was there only 40 percent of the time. So I didn’t have that many things that were pointing any good direction, and acting was the first thing I felt I might actually be good at.”

Kinnaman landed roles in a couple of small Swedish films, and then one in his homeland’s ultimate crossover entertainment product—The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. After that came Suicide SquadHouse of Cards, and now his dystopian Netflix series. “Altered Carbon takes place 300 years in the future,” Kinnaman says. “We now have the technology to download the human consciousness into a chip that is fixed in the back of your neck—and that has led to bodies being interchangeable.” So interchangeable, in fact, that bodies are known simply as “sleeves.”

Kinnaman plays a kind of superwarrior trying to solve a murder (and committing a few himself along the way) in a jacked-up sleeve that’s intimidatingly huge—but not as huge as he’d like, if he had his choice in real life. “I’d take The Rock’s sleeve any day,” he says. “That would be fun—to be the biggest guy in the room.”