October 30, 2019

For the second time this year, Joel appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, this time for the promotion of For All Mankind as it nears its series premiere. He also talked about the “accidental” Instagram video and meeting Barack Obama. Check out the interview below, along with photos and screencaps in our gallery!

Joel did an interview with Marc Malkin on Variety’s Big Ticket podcast and talked about For All Mankind, the Suicide Squad sequel, and his long-time friend Robert Pattinson being the new Batman!

MEN’S JOURNAL – In person, Kinnaman actually has plenty to say—at least when not demolishing crawfish. He’s an engaging and funny storyteller, though it helps, obviously, that he’s got a good story to tell. There are many paths to stardom, but not many as picaresque as Kinnaman’s.

We begin before his birth, at a wedding in Laos while the Vietnam War slogs on nearby. Steve Kinnaman, Joel’s father, is an American GI stationed in Bangkok. He has snuck away on a three-day pass to witness the marriage of a friend to a woman who is half-Laotian, half-Vietnamese. It is his first contact with the people his government has been fighting, and the love-filled ceremony confirms some of the niggling doubts he has already been starting to feel about the war. When he returns to base, to the news that his unit is about to be deployed, he decides to go in a different direction. Steve burns his passport, hitchhikes north, and lives on the run in Laos for five years, centered at the Blind Eye, a Vientiane bar that plays host to a Casablanca-like cast of hippies, journalists, drug dealers, CIA agents, and other assorted expats.

It would all make an incredible movie, and in fact Kinnaman and his father, now 74, have been discussing making one. “I’ve been toying with the idea of playing my father,” Kinnaman says. “But I’m getting a little too old, so I might just direct. It’s really a young man’s story.” The tale is still emotionally fraught in the family, too. Steve neglected to tell his family back home where he had gone until two years after eventually fleeing to Sweden, which offered asylum to deserters from the war. The wound lingers still—which is another motivation for maybe making a film, Kinnaman says.

“I see it as a sort of reconciliation project, too,” he says. “Even though I don’t live there”—he moved to Los Angeles 10 years ago—“everything I do is to create a base of both economic security for my family and also arenas where they can all come together.”

Each of Kinnaman’s arms is covered with elaborate set-piece tattoos. On the left is a chiaroscuro of women’s faces, flowers, and vines. It is, he explains, a cover-up of an older piece of ink. “I walked into a parlor in the 1990s and literally thought this exact sentence: ‘Obviously I’m getting a tribal tattoo because they are definitely never going out of style,’” he says, wryly.

A similar spirit of jovial self-mockery is evident on his other biceps, where the last line from The Tempest, written in Swedish, has been crossed out and replaced. “It was supposed to say sleep but it said dream,” he shrugs. Beneath the corrected quote is a stylized tableau of Sodermalm, the Stockholm neighborhood where Steve Kinnaman ended up after decamping to Sweden and where the younger Kinnaman was raised. Now one of the city’s most gentrified districts, it was, in those days, a working class neighborhood and bohemian stronghold. Family life there was complicated and colorful. Kinnaman sat in the middle of five sisters from various mothers, often moving around from house to house. “My family’s a mess,” he says. “But it’s a beautiful mess.”

He describes it as a happy childhood, but nevertheless, from an early age, he was attracted to more dangerous company. By 10, he was hanging out with a rough group of friends, robbing people, stealing cars, dealing low-level drugs, and engaging in the ritualized group violence of soccer hooliganism, in which bands of supporters of opposing teams would meet in hand-to hand combat on the streets. “It was an incredible, powerful group dynamic,” he says. “Being in a group and just rushing toward another group.”

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March 23, 2019

Promotion for Hanna continues as Joel appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon last March 21st. Aside from discussing the show, Joel also taught Jimmy a Swedish Midsummer celebration! Check out the interview below, and screencaps in our gallery, along with one high-quality still, thanks to my friend Sammy at Shane West Network.

Joel and Mireille recently sat down with Los Angeles Times to discuss Hanna. They talked about a lot of interesting things, including how the dynamic differs from what we were used to with The Killing, their characters, and the best of all, how they got cast! You can read the full article at the Los Angeles Times website, but here’s are some snippets:

“It’s super wonderful to be back working with each other,” Enos says at Amazon’s Culver City headquarters, where she and Kinnaman have come together to discuss the series. Kinnaman smiles and nods in agreement.
Playing adversaries instead of partners marks a dramatic shift for the two actors — one they have excitedly embraced.

“It was a little trippy the first day we had shooting because the dynamic could not be more different,” Kinnaman says. “But after a couple of takes, it just flowed. We really work well together, and we pick up on little things each other does. I go this way a little bit, and she goes right there. It’s a little dance. It makes it so easy and fun.”

They both welcome the change in dynamics for “Hanna.”

“If we were playing two pals,” Enos says, “I don’t know if we could have done it.”

“I liked that it was so polar opposite,” Kinnaman adds. “Because we had such a good and long relationship on ‘The Killing,’ it was very important to both of us. ‘The Killing’ is one of those things that kinda stuck with people. There’s a danger of going back to the well.”

Enos was the first to be approached by Farr for the series. “We met at a spa hotel where she was shooting in England,” he says, “and I thought she would be perfect for the re-invention of the character.”

Enos says she was asked who she felt might be a good choice to play Erik. “In my mind, the character was a little older than Joel, so I told them to send me some of their favorite names of people in their mid-40s, ex-military.

“They got back to me and said, ‘Actually we were thinking of talking to Joel and wanted to see how you felt about that. I said, ‘Favorite human! On the planet!’ ”

Looking fondly at Enos, Kinnaman says, “Mireille basically cast me.”

March 05, 2019

Joel and Mireille spoke with Collider during a set visit in Budapest, Hungary, wherein they discussed their characters’ relationship in Hanna and how it differs from what fans are used to in The Killing. Here’s a snippet:

“I think some people are gonna be a little disappointed, you know, because I know that there are a lot of people that really loved our relationship on The Killing and are very excited to see us play again,” Kinnaman told a small group of press. “I think there’s going to be an automatic longing to sort of see a similar kind of dynamic but there’s not going to be any of that. It’s very different.”

Enos echoed Kinnaman’s sentiments. “There’s no crossover, there’s none,” she said, plainly and simply. “There, we were partners with, like, a completely non-kind of romantic relationship. So we had each other’s back and we were not interested in making out. And here, we are enemies with, potentially, a history. So it’s like the polar opposite which has been fun!”

While the relationship that plays out between the two in Hanna is vastly different — Kinnaman plays Erik, Hanna’s vengeful father and former employee of Enos’ Marissa, who, for all intents and purposes, is the villain of the series — the actors were quick to acknowledge the natural chemistry that came with working together again … even if Erik’s goal is, according to Kinnaman, “securing the future and safety of Hanna.” How can he accomplish this task? “Marissa has to go down,” the actor explained.

For the duo, playing this different antagonistic dynamic has been a breath of fresh air and thoroughly enjoyable. “I wondered going in, what’s it going to be like to play this different dynamic with him because there are scenes where we end up talking about the past and stuff,” Enos revealed. “It was so fun. It’s just like a dance.”

This dance partner analogy is something actors are familiar with. When in a scene, you’re only as good as the partner you’re working with, which shows that even if the characters being played are on opposite sides, this sort of behind-the-scenes teamwork is essential. With that said, Kinnaman thoroughly agreed with Enos’ assessment, going so far as to use the same exact analogy.