Joel has graced the cover of this month’s issue of L’Uomo Vogue magazine. Check out the beautiful outtakes in our gallery!

On his political views: “I used to have a much clearer idea of where I stood on the political spectrum, but now I’m much more fluid. I’ve become much more of a centrist in many ways. I grew up in Sweden in a very strong state where there’s much more opportunity for people who come from the lower classes to do a class migration, and of course I see the structure of a Swedish society with higher taxes, free education, free healthcare and those things of course play into that but at the same time I look at the entrepreneurial spirit of the US and see real value in that too. In any society where you can look in someone’s mouth and see if they’re rich or poor, the society has failed them.”

On his go-to designers: “For red carpet, I like Dior, Ferragamo, Valentino, Brioni. For more casualwear I like ACNE, APC and Common Projects. I’m involved with a Swedish watch brand called Carl Edmond that I love. Watches are something I’ll splurge on as they feel timeless and are a solid investment piece.”

On his earliest memory of engaging in fashion: “Probably sneakers. I’ve always loved a great pair of sneakers and as boys running around on the playground and comparing your stuff. That was always a big topic of conversation.”

Just Jared

Joel and Mireille recently sat down with Los Angeles Times to discuss Hanna. They talked about a lot of interesting things, including how the dynamic differs from what we were used to with The Killing, their characters, and the best of all, how they got cast! You can read the full article at the Los Angeles Times website, but here’s are some snippets:

“It’s super wonderful to be back working with each other,” Enos says at Amazon’s Culver City headquarters, where she and Kinnaman have come together to discuss the series. Kinnaman smiles and nods in agreement.
Playing adversaries instead of partners marks a dramatic shift for the two actors — one they have excitedly embraced.

“It was a little trippy the first day we had shooting because the dynamic could not be more different,” Kinnaman says. “But after a couple of takes, it just flowed. We really work well together, and we pick up on little things each other does. I go this way a little bit, and she goes right there. It’s a little dance. It makes it so easy and fun.”

They both welcome the change in dynamics for “Hanna.”

“If we were playing two pals,” Enos says, “I don’t know if we could have done it.”

“I liked that it was so polar opposite,” Kinnaman adds. “Because we had such a good and long relationship on ‘The Killing,’ it was very important to both of us. ‘The Killing’ is one of those things that kinda stuck with people. There’s a danger of going back to the well.”

Enos was the first to be approached by Farr for the series. “We met at a spa hotel where she was shooting in England,” he says, “and I thought she would be perfect for the re-invention of the character.”

Enos says she was asked who she felt might be a good choice to play Erik. “In my mind, the character was a little older than Joel, so I told them to send me some of their favorite names of people in their mid-40s, ex-military.

“They got back to me and said, ‘Actually we were thinking of talking to Joel and wanted to see how you felt about that. I said, ‘Favorite human! On the planet!’ ”

Looking fondly at Enos, Kinnaman says, “Mireille basically cast me.”

November 25, 2018

Last year, Joel became as a brand ambassador for Carl Edmond. This year, the watches brand features Joel once again as they unveiled their new collection. There’s not a lot of photos this time, but I have added three high-quality ones in our gallery.

Joel and his wife, Cleo, appear alongside LGBT couples and twin sister models in the new campaign for Volvo promoting its V60 family-oriented estate car. It’s a series of 10-second vignettes that portray the modern reality of families. You can check out the compiled ads below, as well as one promotional photo of Joel and Cleo in our gallery!

Joel is featured in the latest issue of Vanity Fair Italia magazine. Check out scans and outtakes in our gallery!

Swedish actor Joel Kinnaman got jacked for the new Netflix show Altered Carbon. But his life nearly went in a drastically different direction.

Joel Kinnaman could’ve been a soldier. The Swedish military wanted him. Kinnaman, 38, grew up back in the days when all men in Sweden had to at least try out, and he was planning to tank on purpose. But, he recalls, “when we got out there, we had all these tests—conditioning tests, strength tests, leadership tests. My competitive spirit kicked in and completely removed any pacifistic tendencies.” He crushed the tests, got assigned to an 18-month tour of the north—way up by the Arctic Circle—and thought to himself: Fuck. What did I just do?

In the end, he wound up skipping the service. He tended bar for a while in Norway (not exactly a career) and then decided to give acting a shot. “I was a wild kid and had a lot of friends who were going in the wrong direction really fast,” Kinnaman says. “I didn’t graduate from high school because I was there only 40 percent of the time. So I didn’t have that many things that were pointing any good direction, and acting was the first thing I felt I might actually be good at.”

Kinnaman landed roles in a couple of small Swedish films, and then one in his homeland’s ultimate crossover entertainment product—The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. After that came Suicide SquadHouse of Cards, and now his dystopian Netflix series. “Altered Carbon takes place 300 years in the future,” Kinnaman says. “We now have the technology to download the human consciousness into a chip that is fixed in the back of your neck—and that has led to bodies being interchangeable.” So interchangeable, in fact, that bodies are known simply as “sleeves.”

Kinnaman plays a kind of superwarrior trying to solve a murder (and committing a few himself along the way) in a jacked-up sleeve that’s intimidatingly huge—but not as huge as he’d like, if he had his choice in real life. “I’d take The Rock’s sleeve any day,” he says. “That would be fun—to be the biggest guy in the room.”