Joel and his wife, Cleo, appear alongside LGBT couples and twin sister models in the new campaign for Volvo promoting its V60 family-oriented estate car. It’s a series of 10-second vignettes that portray the modern reality of families. You can check out the compiled ads below, as well as one promotional photo of Joel and Cleo in our gallery!

Joel is featured in the latest issue of Vanity Fair Italia magazine. Check out scans and outtakes in our gallery!

Swedish actor Joel Kinnaman got jacked for the new Netflix show Altered Carbon. But his life nearly went in a drastically different direction.

Joel Kinnaman could’ve been a soldier. The Swedish military wanted him. Kinnaman, 38, grew up back in the days when all men in Sweden had to at least try out, and he was planning to tank on purpose. But, he recalls, “when we got out there, we had all these tests—conditioning tests, strength tests, leadership tests. My competitive spirit kicked in and completely removed any pacifistic tendencies.” He crushed the tests, got assigned to an 18-month tour of the north—way up by the Arctic Circle—and thought to himself: Fuck. What did I just do?

In the end, he wound up skipping the service. He tended bar for a while in Norway (not exactly a career) and then decided to give acting a shot. “I was a wild kid and had a lot of friends who were going in the wrong direction really fast,” Kinnaman says. “I didn’t graduate from high school because I was there only 40 percent of the time. So I didn’t have that many things that were pointing any good direction, and acting was the first thing I felt I might actually be good at.”

Kinnaman landed roles in a couple of small Swedish films, and then one in his homeland’s ultimate crossover entertainment product—The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. After that came Suicide SquadHouse of Cards, and now his dystopian Netflix series. “Altered Carbon takes place 300 years in the future,” Kinnaman says. “We now have the technology to download the human consciousness into a chip that is fixed in the back of your neck—and that has led to bodies being interchangeable.” So interchangeable, in fact, that bodies are known simply as “sleeves.”

Kinnaman plays a kind of superwarrior trying to solve a murder (and committing a few himself along the way) in a jacked-up sleeve that’s intimidatingly huge—but not as huge as he’d like, if he had his choice in real life. “I’d take The Rock’s sleeve any day,” he says. “That would be fun—to be the biggest guy in the room.”

Joel is featured in the November 15th issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine, wherein he talked about watches and mentioned his upcoming show, Altered Carbon. I have added scans and an outtake into the gallery!

So sorry for falling behind on the updates! Recently, Joel became a brand ambassador for the watches brand, Carl Edmond, and you can see his feature on the home page of their website. I have added some outtakes into the gallery!

“To me ‘Be bold, be you.’ represents a certain way of living that’s aligned with how I try to live my life. In short, I think the timepieces capture and reflect that particular essence. It was definitely something that intrigued me. Along with the design that breathes that same attitude. I’ve always worn watches. I love them. I mean they’re practical for obvious reasons but wearing a watch that looks and feels a certain way makes me reflect over the concept of time and how best to spend it. I think there are watches that say something about you; and watches that you can say something about.”

“Personalities and characters I encounter fascinate me. It’s my way of staying interested in my personal growth and exploring what it means to live life to the fullest, this is something I try to remind myself of. Being involved with a watch-brand like Carl Edmond feels very intuitive. Every time I put on my Carl Edmond it serves as a reminder to be here, alive ‘in the moment’ and available to life.”

I read that you grew up in Sweden, but your father was American. Could you tell us what it was it like growing up there and what kind of influence that bicultural exposure had on you?
Growing up in Sweden, I went to an English school where there was a huge mix of kids with different nationalities from all over town. Some of them were wealthy diplomatic kids, and some were from the ghetto suburbs. Going to school in that sort of context around so many different ethnicities and walks of life made me feel that I wasn’t completely Swedish, but that I was more a part of this global, second-generation immigrant community because my father was American.

As a kid, who would you say inspired you to begin acting and why?
It was a combination of things. My sister was an actress, so I saw her do her thing and understood that it was a profession that I could take seriously and do for a living. It also helped that she found a lot of success at a young age and got to work with all the great Swedish film directors such as Lasse Hallström, Ingmar Bergman, and Bo Widerberg, so that really sparked my interest. I also had a good friend of mine that was really into acting, so I was surrounded and exposed to the craft from a pretty young age.

How did you begin your acting career?
After high school I decided I was going to travel for 7 years to make up my mind about life. So to save up money, I planned to work in construction and do all these odd jobs while traveling, but I only got through 1.5 years of that [Laughs.] and decided to apply to the Swedish National acting school. I didn’t get in right away though. It took a while because in Sweden, you have to prepare monologues to apply, and they only accept about 10 applicants out of 1,500. But as I began preparing these monologues, I was able to viscerally experience the material in a way where I could shape the words and move through the scene as if I was actually there. I had this feeling that I might actually be good at this and became hooked. Needless to say, I got accepted to the program.

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