Joel is featured in the November 15th issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine, wherein he talked about watches and mentioned his upcoming show, Altered Carbon. I have added scans and an outtake into the gallery!

So sorry for falling behind on the updates! Recently, Joel became a brand ambassador for the watches brand, Carl Edmond, and you can see his feature on the home page of their website. I have added some outtakes into the gallery!

“To me ‘Be bold, be you.’ represents a certain way of living that’s aligned with how I try to live my life. In short, I think the timepieces capture and reflect that particular essence. It was definitely something that intrigued me. Along with the design that breathes that same attitude. I’ve always worn watches. I love them. I mean they’re practical for obvious reasons but wearing a watch that looks and feels a certain way makes me reflect over the concept of time and how best to spend it. I think there are watches that say something about you; and watches that you can say something about.”

“Personalities and characters I encounter fascinate me. It’s my way of staying interested in my personal growth and exploring what it means to live life to the fullest, this is something I try to remind myself of. Being involved with a watch-brand like Carl Edmond feels very intuitive. Every time I put on my Carl Edmond it serves as a reminder to be here, alive ‘in the moment’ and available to life.”

I read that you grew up in Sweden, but your father was American. Could you tell us what it was it like growing up there and what kind of influence that bicultural exposure had on you?
Growing up in Sweden, I went to an English school where there was a huge mix of kids with different nationalities from all over town. Some of them were wealthy diplomatic kids, and some were from the ghetto suburbs. Going to school in that sort of context around so many different ethnicities and walks of life made me feel that I wasn’t completely Swedish, but that I was more a part of this global, second-generation immigrant community because my father was American.

As a kid, who would you say inspired you to begin acting and why?
It was a combination of things. My sister was an actress, so I saw her do her thing and understood that it was a profession that I could take seriously and do for a living. It also helped that she found a lot of success at a young age and got to work with all the great Swedish film directors such as Lasse Hallström, Ingmar Bergman, and Bo Widerberg, so that really sparked my interest. I also had a good friend of mine that was really into acting, so I was surrounded and exposed to the craft from a pretty young age.

How did you begin your acting career?
After high school I decided I was going to travel for 7 years to make up my mind about life. So to save up money, I planned to work in construction and do all these odd jobs while traveling, but I only got through 1.5 years of that [Laughs.] and decided to apply to the Swedish National acting school. I didn’t get in right away though. It took a while because in Sweden, you have to prepare monologues to apply, and they only accept about 10 applicants out of 1,500. But as I began preparing these monologues, I was able to viscerally experience the material in a way where I could shape the words and move through the scene as if I was actually there. I had this feeling that I might actually be good at this and became hooked. Needless to say, I got accepted to the program.

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Mr Joel Kinnaman is hungry. As soon as MR PORTER’s photoshoot has wrapped, the 6ft 2in Swede jaywalks across Main Street in Downtown LA and straight into the first restaurant he sees. “Bäco Mercat? Fine. Table for two, please. And I’ll have the steak medium-rare, the Hamachi crudo, the shrimp and the lentil salad.”

The waitress smiles. “OK, then, that’s plenty for two. You know that everything here is meant to be shared?”

“No, that’s just for me,” says Mr Kinnaman, giving her a blank stare. “I’m really hungry.”

He’s not kidding. Mr Kinnaman is bulking up right now. So much so, that MR PORTER’s stylist had to go up a size on the Ermenegildo Zegna collection he is modelling to mark the brand’s arrival on site.

It’s 5.30pm, and time for his second lunch, just a couple of hours before his first dinner, which will be a pound of meat or fish. “I need to make 215lb by November,” he says. “That’s when we start shooting Altered Carbon. It’s Netflix’s biggest show so far, its answer to Game Of Thrones. I have to be ready. In my opening scene I come out in a loin cloth and fight six people.”

So he’s shaving, presumably, like a serious bodybuilder? “Totally. All about the shaving. And baby oil. I carry a jug with me just in case.”

Altered Carbon is a hard, R-rated sci-fi set 500 years in the future. Bodies are dispensable, our personalities are held in microchips and the rich are crushing the poor. A classic dystopia. “A lot of comparisons with Blade Runner,” he says, “but with lots more sex, violence and dismemberment.”

It also goes to show just how high Mr Kinnaman is flying these days. “I was the first one to be cast,” he says. “Projects are being cast around me now.”

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Joel is featured in the May 23 issue of Adweek magazine. I have also updated the gallery with additional outtakes from the Backstage photo session from last year that is featured in this article.